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Study of a New X-Ray Scatter Rejection Technique Based On Frequency Division Multiplexing


J Zhang

J Zhang1,2*, S Chang2, J Lu2, O Zhou2, (1) United Imaging Healthcare (2) University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

TH-A-213CD-6 Thursday 8:00:00 AM - 9:55:00 AM Room: 213CD

Purpose:
X-ray scatter may significantly degrade imaging performance in x-ray radiography applications in terms of soft tissue contrast reduction, potentially severe image artifacts, and increased patient dose. We recently developed a new x-ray scatter rejection method based on nanotechnology-enabled frequency division multiplexing x-ray (FDMX) imaging technique. In this study we report our recent work on developing this new scatter rejection method and evaluating its performance.

Methods:
The key enabling technology is the carbon nanotube (CNT)-based multi-beam field emission x-ray (MBFEX) source technology. The proposed FDMX imaging system has a MBFEX source with an array of x-ray tubes. The x-ray radiation from each individual x-ray tube is modulated at a certain given frequency. The collimated x-ray beams passed through the object and were captured by a high speed x-ray detector. A demultiplexing algorithm was applied to reject the scatter radiation from the primary radiation based on their different modulation frequencies.

Results:
The x-ray images generated by the FDMX imaging technique clearly demonstrated improved imaging quality in terms of lower scatter-to-primary-ratio (SPR) and higher contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR). It shows great potential of improving x-ray imaging performance and reducing patient dose.

Conclusions:
We recently developed a novel x-ray scatter reduction method based on nanotechnology-enabled frequency division multiplexing x-ray (FDMX) imaging technique. The FDMX imaging system has a MBFEX source with an array of x-ray tubes. The x-ray radiations from the MBFEX source were modulated at different frequencies. The scatter radiations were decoupled from the primary radiations based on their different modulation frequencies. This novel scatter reduction method, once fully developed, will have a great potential in improving x-ray imaging quality and reducing patient dose.

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