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Optimizing Dose in the Interventional Suite: Do You Really Need That Image Quality?


R Dixon


RG Dixon1*, (1) University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC

MO-D-217A-1 Monday 2:00:00 PM - 2:55:00 PM Room: 217A

The imaging equipment used to guide interventions has evolved significantly in the recent past. As a result, the equipment has become more complex to operate. This evolution has left many operators ill equipped to fully optimize the radiation dose delivered, as they are often more focused on the technical skills required to complete the case rather than balancing image quality and radiation dose. In addition, they are usually better trained in these technical skills than in the delivery of optimal dose.
Interventionalists are faced with dose optimization in two main venues: the angiography suite and the CT suite. In the angiographic suite, the operator has the ability to manipulate very simple parameters which can optimize dose. These, in combination with geometric and protective barrier techniques, can create a safe and efficient environment for patients, staff and operators. In addition, with the assistance of a medical physicist, operators can become more facile with their equipment and help to develop local protocols for their institution.
In the CT suite, a similar approach can be applied. While the operator is more dependent on the technologist to manipulate the parameters during a case, the two can work together to optimize the dose for CT-guided procedures. Knowledge of the key variable parameters is paramount to developing this team approach.
This course will review simple techniques that operators can employ to optimize dose during both fluoroscopically- and CT-guided procedures, and will examine the question, “Do you really need that image quality?”

Learning Objectives:
1. Gain a better appreciation of the clinical perspective and need for operator education.
2. Identify simple techniques which can be employed to optimize dose with both fluoroscopically- and CT-guided interventions.
3. Discuss the importance of the question, “Do you really need that image quality?”


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